Mother pleads guilty over child’s poor attendance at school

David Hurley

Reporter:

David Hurley

Limerick Court
Sentencing has been adjourned in the case of a Limerick city mother who was prosecuted over her child’s poor attendance at school.

Sentencing has been adjourned in the case of a Limerick city mother who was prosecuted over her child’s poor attendance at school.

The mother, who can’t be named for legal reasons pleaded guilty, at Limerick Court, to a breach of the Education (Welfare) Act.

Judge Eugene O’Kelly was told she was prosecuted by the National Educational Welfare Board (NEWB) after her daughter missed more than two-thirds of school days during a ten-week period last year.

Solicitor Muiris Gavin, representing the NEWB, said a bench-warrant which was issued last year for the arrest of the woman was executed in recent weeks.

HE said the execution of the bench warrant had led to an improvement of the 15-year-old’s attendance record at school but that there are still concerns about her level of attendance at school.

He said the schoolgirl has been absent for 30% of days during the current academic year and that there is “still room for improvement”.

Solicitor Ted McCarthy, representing the defendant, said he is optimistic that the current situation will continue and he said his client wished to enter a guilty plea to the charge before the court.

Judge Eugene O’Kelly noted the plea and agreed to adjourn the matter until April 5, next for.

Mr Gavin said the NEWB is hoping there will be 100% attendance between now and the next date.

Adjourning the case, Judge O’Kelly informed the woman that the sentence he imposes will be influenced by whether or not there is an improvement in her daughter’s school attendance record.