Census paints a new portrait of a diverse Limerick

Anne Sheridan

Reporter:

Anne Sheridan

IT’S OFFICIAL - most Limerick people like a lie-in. Not everyone likes getting up early, but figures released by the Central Statistics Office show that some 1,000 people living in Limerick city leave the house before 6.30 in the morning.

IT’S OFFICIAL - most Limerick people like a lie-in. Not everyone likes getting up early, but figures released by the Central Statistics Office show that some 1,000 people living in Limerick city leave the house before 6.30 in the morning.

But, it seems, they are the exception, as the largest group of people, well over 8,000 are rushing out of the house after 8.30am to get to work, school or college.

The latest compilings from the CSO paints Limerick from many different angles - it shows the number of vacant units on certain streets, the areas which are most ethnically diverse, the areas where unemployment is the highest, and how we have lost our grá of the cúpla focail.

One new aspect on the CSO website is where people can zoom in on a small area of the country, and examine that area’s profile. The census was carried out on April 10, 2011, with forms collected from just under two million dwellings.

The figures show that there were 56,521 people living in Limerick city at that time, and over 4,500 residents listed their birthplace as Poland and the UK, or nearly 10% of the population. In terms of overall ethnic and cultural background, nearly 700 people listed themselves as being “black or black Irish”, with over 1,000 Asian people living in the city. Regarding foreign languages spoken in the city, Polish was the most dominant, followed by French and Lithuanian.

The Census reveals that there are more 6,000 families in the city having six or more children, and the regeneration areas of Moyross and St Mary’s Park favouring large families over most other areas. There were also over 4,380 family units with no children.

Out of 182 residents in one area of King’s Island, only one person said they spoke Irish outside of education.

One area around Henry Street shows that of the 274 residents, just 45% were Irish and in a broad area from O’Connell Street up towards Pery Square, 53% of residents listing their country of origin as “the rest of the world” - ie. not from Ireland, Poland, Lithuania, the UK or other EU states.