Limerick cleans up in litter survey

Nick Rabbitts

Reporter:

Nick Rabbitts

Thomas Street was one of 17 streets in the city centre which received a grade a ranking in the latest IBAL survey [Picture: Adrian Butler]
Limerick city has made a dramatic improvement in its efforts to combat littering, with many areas now being rated as ‘Grade A’ for cleanliness.

Limerick city has made a dramatic improvement in its efforts to combat littering, with many areas now being rated as ‘Grade A’ for cleanliness.

The latest survey carried out by the Irish Business Against Litter (IBAL) federation in conjunction with An Taisce has seen Limerick ranked in a respectable 22nd place out of 42 towns and cities surveyed.

The city is now ‘clean to European norms’, according to the influential report.

The inspectors - who visit cities unannounced - praised Limerick for it’s “best performance yet” in the IBAL Anti-Litter survey.

In recent years, Limerick has languished close to the bottom of the league, with last September’s survey showing the city to be the most littered outside Dublin.

But this year, 17 out of the 27 streets surveyed achieved the top grade A status, with only one street getting the lowest grade D.

The inspectors praised the approach roads into the city, while they also gave top marks to Tesco at Coonagh Cross, the Gaelic Grounds, and the National Technology Park.

There was a “virtual absence of litter throughout” O’Connell Street, while the newly redeveloped John’s Square was praised for its “pedestrian friendly environment with granite paving, ornamental trees, plenty of bicycle parking and traffic calming measures”.

Meanwhile, a “positive” impression was left on the inspectors on Thomas Street, while the paving in Foxes Bow was “fresh and clean in appearance”.

Although Tesco in Coonagh was marked as a “superb site”, the Coonagh Roundabout scored lower because of the “loose litter” present, the inspectors said.

Old Francis Street in St John’s was the only street to score a grade D.

“It wasn’t just casually littered by dumping. One corner was literally a mount of discarded rubbish,” the inspectors wrote.

Davis Street also came in for criticism, in particular the “grubby” wall surfaces.

Cavan town came top of the IBAL Anti-Litter League, with Dublin’s north inner city bringing up the rear, marked as a “litter blackspot”.*