Disruption to water services to continue in Limerick for another 'couple of days'

DISRUPTION to water services may continue in Limerick city for another "couple of days" according to Limerick City Council, after rising temperatures, broken pipes and a huge increase in demand saw homes across the city continue to be without water after several days of shortages.

DISRUPTION to water services may continue in Limerick city for another "couple of days" according to Limerick City Council, after rising temperatures, broken pipes and a huge increase in demand saw homes across the city continue to be without water after several days of shortages.

Demand for water was running at 1.5 times the normal amount this Tuesday as some homes began to receive water after several days with no supply. Callers also experienced problems connecting with Limerick City Council's emergency line, such was the volume of calls.

A spokesperson for Corporate Services in Limerick City Council apologised for the difficulties callers were having in connecting to the emergency line in City Hall, and confirmed that the council had "people working full time on the ground, attempting to assist with the speedy return of all water supplies".

A dramatic increase in temperatures over the past couple of days has given rise to burst pipes across Limerick, with four "localized breakages" reducing water pressure around Clonmacken, Ballincurra Gardens, Irish Estates and Ennis Road, and leaving many homes without water.

Homes across Limerick city and county were without water over Christmas, and Joe Delaney of Limerick City Council Corporate Services, acknowledged the difficulties people had and that there were "widespread shortages" in the city.

"It is not widespread in the sense of whole estates being without water, but it is widespread in a sense that there are people across the city (still) without water," he explained.

Asked what had caused the disruption to water supplies, Mr Delaney said there were a number of potential factors.

"It is probably a couple of things that we think it is due to, but the water is flowing through the city mains. What it could be is reduced pressure due to increased demand. The demand is up by one and a half times because water is coming back and has started to fill up tanks and demand has shot up."

Mr Delaney said a "significant number" of houses were without water on Christmas Day, "due to weather conditions", but added that a significant number of those households had restored services.