John Dundon calls judge a ‘big fat pig’

David Hurley

Reporter:

David Hurley

John Dundon
JOHN Dundon who is accused of murdering rugby player Shane Geoghegan called a senior judge a “big fat pig” when he appeared before the Special Criminal Court this afternoon.

JOHN Dundon who is accused of murdering rugby player Shane Geoghegan called a senior judge a “big fat pig” when he appeared before the Special Criminal Court this afternoon.

Dundon, aged 29, of Hyde Road, Ballinacurra Weston made his comments after the non-jury court refused an application to adjourn the trial to allow his lawyers examine the large amount of evidence in the case.

After Mr Justice Paul Butler, presiding, refused the application, Dundon said he did not believe he would get a fair trial.

“I know I’m a Dundon, but I’m a human being - but do you want to find me guilty now or find me guilty on another date?” he said.

Dundon who appeared before the court via video link from the Midlands Prison could also be heard saying: “To me, there is no fair trial there.”

As Mr Justice Butler indicated that the court would rise, Dundon could also be heard saying “Okay, okay, run away”, before shouting “Ya big fat pig” as he stood up and turned away from the video-link camera.

Dundon’s trial is listed to begin early next month but last week his lawyers sought to have the case adjourned to allow them examine the large volume of documents and CCTV in the case.

Shane O’Callaghan BL said more than 26,000 pages of evidence had served on the defence by the prosecution along with 1,226 discs of CCTV footage - encompassing more than 2,000 hours of footage,.

He said Dundon’s solicitors - Madden & Finucane - estimated that one person working for seven hours per day would take 500 days just to read through the material.

Mr O’Callaghan claimed the evidence had been “thrown together” and was comprised of mixed-up, unnumbered pages, while a number of pages were missing and a large amount of the discs did not work properly.

He said that Madden & Finucane had someone working full time just to “sort out” the material disclosed, a task that was “nowhere near” completion and would not be concluded until the end of this week.

Mr O’Callaghan submitted that this was “totally unacceptable” and in the interests of a fair trial he asked that the matter be adjourned until a date next year.

Tom O’Connell SC, prosecuting, said most of the documents were generated in the course of an earlier, overlapping investigation involving a different individual represented by the same firm of solicitors and he said most of the material was previously disclosed to Dundon’s defence team in April.

This Wednesday’s ruling means the trial, which will last a number of weeks, is likely to go ahead, as listed, on June 4, next.