Cannabis was ‘stolen’ from Limerick warehouse

David Hurley

Reporter:

David Hurley

Deividas Gineika avoided a prison sentence
A WAREHOUSE worker who stole a number of packages containing cannabis after they were delivered to the logistics company where he worked avoided a prison sentence. because of the “unusual” circumstances of the case.

A WAREHOUSE worker who stole a number of packages containing cannabis after they were delivered to the logistics company where he worked avoided a prison sentence. because of the “unusual” circumstances of the case.

Deividas Gineika, aged 29, who has an address at South Quay, Newcastle West was working at Rathkeale-based All Star Logistics in May 2013 when a large quantity of packages arrived at the warehouse.

During a sentencing hearing, Limerick Circuit Court heard that four bags of cannabis were concealed within the delivery and that Gineika removed two of the bags and stashed the other two within the warehouse.

Michael Collins BL, prosecuting, said around a month later the defendant was dismissed for matters which were not connected with drugs or the proceedings before the court.

The court was told gardai were alerted on June 20, 2013 after the two bags which Gineika had stashed in the warehouse were discovered during a cleanup of the facility.

During a subsequent search of the defendant’s home, the two bags of cannabis which had been removed from the warehouse were found in a press in the kitchen.

The drugs weighed almost 2kgs and had a street value of around €35,000.

Garda Jason Mitchell told the court the defendant was arrested at a nearby house a short time later and made “full and frank” admissions.

Garda Mitchell said he accepted Gineika “just came upon” the cannabis in the course of his work and that he was not the intended recipient.

John O’Sullivan BL, defending, said his client - a Lithuanian nation - arrived in Ireland in 2004 and had worked for All Star for four years.

He said the defendant was not involved in the sale or supply of drugs and that the offence was purely “opportunistic”.

Gineika, he said, had learned a salutary lesson after he pleaded guilty.

Imposing sentence, Judge Tom O’Donnell said he had to be conscious of the decision of the DPP not to prefer a more serious charge - given the value of the drugs seized.

He added that given the extremely unusual facts of the case, it would not be in the interests of justice or the public good to impose an immediate custodial sentence.

He imposed a two years prison sentence, which he suspended for two years on condition the defendant stays out of trouble during that time.