Boost for Limerick businesses with transfer of key lands

Nick Rabbitts

Reporter:

Nick Rabbitts

HUNDREDS of acres of industrial land, worth millions of euro, look likely to be transferred to the new local authority, in hopes of attracting big business.

HUNDREDS of acres of industrial land, worth millions of euro, look likely to be transferred to the new local authority, in hopes of attracting big business.

The report of the Denis Brosnan-chaired Limerick Reorganisation Implementation Group, published this week, calls for the transfer of Shannon Development owned sites in Askeaton, Newcastle West and Kilmallock to the new local authority.

The report also wants to see the larger economic estates in Raheen and Plassey transferred either to the IDA, or the new local authority - which under the plans will be named Limerick City and County Council.

The move is seen as a boost to both businesses, economic director Tom Enright says, with the local authority able to provide a one-stop shop from land ownership and planning to commercial rate and development contribution schemes.

The parks in Newcastle West and Kilmallock are home to small industries, while the facility in Askeaton is empty.

It is hoped this transfer will “greatly enhance the local authority’s capacity and remit to attract investment and provide a one-stop shop in relation to the facilitation of new medium to large investment and indigenous industries.” The comprehensive report also contains plans to introduce an economic group comprising of key business leaders, representatives of state agencies, and other people who can assist in bringing investment to Limerick.

This would be similar to the Louth economic forum, introduced under the stewardship of local authority boss Conn Murray, which ultimately delivered 1,000 jobs at Paypal in Dundalk.

The city gets a boost from the report, with the news that the new “corporate headquarters” of the joint authority will be in the heart of the city, as opposed to Dooradoyle.

But there will be 50% cut in management numbers, with a further 20% cut expected in front-line staff numbers.