SVP appeal to Abercrombie & Fitch over clothes

David Hurley

Reporter:

David Hurley

THE President of the Saint Vincent De Paul in Limerick has appealed to US clothing giant Abercrombie & Fitch to donate clothes it seized from a Limerick shop to charity rather than destroying them.

THE President of the Saint Vincent De Paul in Limerick has appealed to US clothing giant Abercrombie & Fitch to donate clothes it seized from a Limerick shop to charity rather than destroying them.

Last week, the Ohio-based company successfully sued McGazz Limited for breaches of the Trademark Act after more than 800 items of clothes were seized from the McGazz store at the Milk Market in June.

Limerick District Court was told the clothes, which are worth tens of thousands of euro, were genuine Abercrombie & Fitch items but that the store did not have permission to sell them.

Conor Twomey, owner of McGazz admitted buying the clothes in the United States and posting them back to Limerick to sell them.

“These goods are absolutely 100% genuine and legal,” he said adding that he has never bought or sold counterfeit goods at the store.

Peter Clein BL, representing Abercrombie & Fitch, said his client only sells its clothing (including the Hollister Brand) in stores and outlets which it owns and operates.

He told the court the company is due to open its first store in Ireland next month.

Following the conclusion of the court case, lawyers for Abercrombie & Fitch resisted proposals that the clothes be donated in charity.

Michael Murphy of the Saint Vincent de Paul says the attitude of the company is disappointing and does not make sense.

He is urging Abercrombie & Fitch to reconsider its position in relation to the clothes.

“I certainly feel it is terrible in these times, it is a terrible waste of good clothes just to destroy them,” he said.

“It is a pity and it would have been a good PR exercise because certainly I think it would have been welcomed by any right-minded person given the opportunity of these clothes going to families who in normal circumstances could not afford to purchase them,” he added.

It is understood the clothes seized in June are being stored by Abercrombie & Fitch at a secure lockup facility in County Roscommon.

However, they cannot be destroyed until later this week at the earliest when the deadline for an appeal to be lodged has passed.”