Limerick City businesses set to enter ‘Tidy Towns’

Nick Rabbitts


Nick Rabbitts

CITY businesses will get together this year in a bid to secure Tidy Towns gold.

CITY businesses will get together this year in a bid to secure Tidy Towns gold.

While the majority of the entries to the competition - which will also tie in with the JP McManus-backed Community Challenge - are to come from community groups in suburbs, the Limerick City Business Association has had the novel idea to enter as a group.

They will launch their entry in the next few weeks, but it will encompass the whole of the city centre - from the Crescent down to King John’s Castle.

Association spokesman Helen O’Donnell said the city entering the Tidy Towns competition has been in the pipeline for a number of months.

They have been working with the City Council, and attending the popular Local Heroes event in a bid to formulate a three year plan to win the competition.

“If we could get just a teaspoonful of the pride and enthusiasm that people will show on Easter Sunday at Thomond Park when Munster come onto the pitch, if we could take a spoon of that and bring it into the city, we would produce lots for Limerick,” she explained.

Ms O’Donnell said many people who are not based in the city itself have come forward because they want to help make the city as clean as it can be.

Last week, more than 70 people from communities across the city expressed an interest in taking part in the Tidy Towns competition.

Limerick City Council held a seminar which showed the benefits of keeping communities clean.

Those who took part received presentations from Caroline Curley, environmental director of service, Lorraine Power, who adjudicates the annual Tidy Towns competition, as well as representatives from groups participating in last year’s contest.

For the first time this year, groups from the city’s suburbs, currently based in the County Council attended City Hall as part of a scheme with the County Council’s Community and Enterprise Section.

Ms Curley said the seminar was aimed at urban residents and groups who want to learn and apply for the Tidy Towns competition for the first time, those who applied for the first time last year, and want to apply this year, and individuals who want to support community groups:

“Last year the Community Challenge competition combined with Tidy Towns was a great success and I can confirm that a related competition involving the JP McManus Charitable Foundation Trust will be launched soon,” Ms Curley explained.