Brave Adam, 10, making strides in cancer battle

Gerard Fitzgibbon

Reporter:

Gerard Fitzgibbon

A YOUNG county Limerick cancer sufferer who captured the hearts of the entire nation two years ago with a charity single is making strides on his road to recovery, his mother has said.

A YOUNG county Limerick cancer sufferer who captured the hearts of the entire nation two years ago with a charity single is making strides on his road to recovery, his mother has said.

Ten-year-old Adam O’Sullivan from Ballagh stormed to the top of the Irish charts at Christmas 2011 with his rendition of folk classic Whiskey in the Jar with traditional music superstars, The High Kings.

The single raised thousands of euro for Temple Street and Crumlin children’s hospitals, and saw Adam catapulted on to the national stage with performances on The Late Late Show on RTE and in front of a packed crowd at Thomond Park.

His mother Joanne said that two years on, Adam is continuing to respond positively to treatment for a benign brain tumour which he has battled for much of his young life.

“He’s very well, thank God. He was in Crumlin in September, and they told him he wouldn’t have to come back for six months, until March, which will be the longest he’s gone without being in hospital. They’re very pleased with him in Crumlin.”

2012 saw Adam keep alive his now well-established status as the unofficial fifth member of The High Kings, performing with them on stage in Killarney and in front of a crowd of thousands on the closing night of the Knights of WestFest festival in Newcastle West. He also moved up into fourth class at St Mary’s boys NS, and passed his first level piano playing exams.

Adam’s efforts to raise money for the two hospitals where he has undergone surgery and treatment during his battle with illness turned him into a local celebrity.

He was among the nominees for Limerick’s person of the year for 2011, and was also able to fulfil a dream when he was chosen as a Manchester United mascot, leading the team out at Old Trafford in August 2011.

Joanne said that while Adam is likely to be in and out of hospital for many years to come, his doctors are very happy with how he has responded to treatment.

“They’re just keeping an eye on him. You never know from day to day how it might affect him. But he doesn’t have to go back in for another MRI until August.

“He only has to go in for an out-patient check up in August, just to see if he’s feeling OK”.