Georgian architecture art exhibition to highlight heritage of Limerick city

Niamh Dillon

Reporter:

Niamh Dillon

An art exhibition and walking tour titled “Under your Feet” featuring Limerick’s Georgian architecture in the Raggle Taggle Consortium on the corner of 7 Sarsfield Street, Limerick will run until Friday, August 24.

An art exhibition and walking tour titled “Under your Feet” featuring Limerick’s Georgian architecture in the Raggle Taggle Consortium on the corner of 7 Sarsfield Street, Limerick will run until Friday, August 24.

The drawings and photographs featured in the “Under your Feet - An exploration of the street furniture of Limerick City” exhibition which aims to highlight the forgotten architectural heritage of the city including boot-scrapers and coal hole covers which were once part of everyday life in Limerick.

“I decided to start up these tours and art exhibition as I felt the city’s architecture was under appreciated and so many people walk past these unique features everyday without realising,” said architect and organiser Morgan Flynn.

“Limerick is the only city in Europe which used square manhole covers which can easily fall through compared to round covers so it shows Limerick chose fashion and appearance over practicality.

“The drawings and photos in the exhibition show how these objects were designed and made with highly skilled levels of craftsmanship in the foundries of the city,” he adds.

“The boot-scrapers can be seen to the sides of the front doors and were a necessity in a city where horses were the main mode of transport and paved streets were a rarity.

“The coal hole covers are located in the footpaths in front of many of the Georgian houses and gave access to the coal cellars which were below street level and the coal was then used to heat the houses and could be delivered without dust being brought into the finer rooms of the houses,” explained Mr Flynn.

In 1765 Georgian architecture in Limerick city was spearheaded by Edmund Sexton Pery who was a speaker at the Irish House of Commons, and whose name has been retained in the Georgian city centre area of Newtown Pery.

“We hope that this exhibition will bring about an awareness and appreciation for the city’s forgotten heritage. Limerick is lucky that much of its original Georgian features are still there,” added Mr Flynn.

The exhibition has been organised by Limerick-based architects Morgan Flynn, Eleanor Moloney and Sinead Jennings.

The art exhibition is the first stage of a project which aims to record and display the many exquisite aspects of Georgian architecture which has played a central part to Limerick for over 200 years. The exhibition and walking tours are free to the public and will run until Friday August 24 with the walking tours starting at 1pm daily from the exhibition.

The project is supported by the Nat ional Heritage Council.