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Jobs ‘could go abroad’ due to Limerick’s skills gap

Professor Helena Lenihan of the Kemmy Business School said the shortage of suitably qualified Irish candidates has encouraged companies down the route of inward immigration

Professor Helena Lenihan of the Kemmy Business School said the shortage of suitably qualified Irish candidates has encouraged companies down the route of inward immigration

  • by Nick Rabbitts
 

THOUSANDS of local software jobs could be lost to rival countries unless a skills and investment shortgage is addressed, a report published in Limerick states.

Lero, the software engineering research centre based in the Kemmy Business School at UL has teamed up with Cambridge University’s centre for science, technology and innovation.

Between them, they surveyed a number of companies involved in software development.

It was concluded that although firms have increased headcounts, due to a shortage of skilled workers locally, thousands of jobs could go overseas, rather than in Ireland. This is according to Prof Brian Fitzgerald, chief scientist at Lero.

The report suggests that indigenous companies, which make up almost 80% of the total number of software firms in Ireland, have created employment faster than foreign/multinationals over the last three years. The indigenous firms which responded to this survey grew their software-related employment by 39%, while multinationals grew theirs by 23%.

Professor Helena Lenihan of the Kemmy Business School added that the shortage of suitably qualified Irish candidates has encouraged companies down the route of inward immigration. She said up to 55% of jobs are filled like this.

 

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