60% surge for UL programmes in CAO applications

Anne Sheridan

Reporter:

Anne Sheridan

The University of Limerick: increase in CAO applications for science programmes
SIXTY per cent of programmes at the University of Limerick saw a “strong increase” in the number of CAO applications, with science programmes seeing the largest increase and IT seeing the main decrease.

SIXTY per cent of programmes at the University of Limerick saw a “strong increase” in the number of CAO applications, with science programmes seeing the largest increase and IT seeing the main decrease.

Professor Don Barry, president of UL, said against a national trend of decreasing CAO applications this year, UL’s programmes continue to be highly sought after by students with excellent Leaving Certificate results.

Interest is up in UL programmes in arts, humanities and social sciences, with some of the highest percentage increases in applicants being attributed to these programmes. Applications for the Irish and new media programme up by 150% and over all applications increasing by 28%.

Four out of UL’s five business programmes have registered large increases in applications, with applications for Business and French up 21%.

Mental health nursing registered an increase of 17% in applications, general nursing is up 11% and mature midwifery programme has attracted 23% more applications than in 2012.

In science, pharmaceutical and industrial chemistry saw an increase of 79% in first preference applications. Industrial biochemistry has registered an increase of 57% in general applications. Food and health science is up by 23% and applied physics up by 14%. With the exception of chemical and biomedical engineering which is up by 49%, overall engineering programmes have not seen as much variation in application numbers. Architecture, however has shown an increase of 20% in applications on 2012 numbers. Applications to UL’s IT programmes have decreased slightly however multimedia and computer game design is up in applications by 11%. Mathematical sciences was down by 24% on last year and civil engineering was down by 8%, with some other courses seeing a fall-off of five per cent.