New guide puts focus on Limerick poems

Nick Rabbitts

Reporter:

Nick Rabbitts

Sharon Slater, Domonic Taylor, Dr Mathew Potter, UrsulaCallaghan, Mark Manning, Serena Hartigan, and Tara Hartigan at the launch of the Limericks Limericks QR code initiative
A CITY walking tour which uses mobile QR codes and limericks to give tourists information has been launched at Culture House.

A CITY walking tour which uses mobile QR codes and limericks to give tourists information has been launched at Culture House.

Limerick’s Limericks is the brainchild of Tara Hartigan, Serena Hartigan and Mark Manning through their company Bundlbee.

The project merges literature, history and technology.

Using a smartphone, tourists are asked to scan a QR code, or visit the dedicated web site limerickslimericks.ie at a series of locations around the city.

These include The Treaty Stone, King John’s Castle, St John’s Square, the People’s Park and O’Connell Avenue.

Tara said the idea was born when she, Serena and Mark were sitting around a table with a glass of wine.

“I always loved limerick poems, and I wondered why there was not more emphasis put on them around the city,” she said. “We feel this project is an important marriage between history, literature and technology.”

Limericks have been placed on plaques art these locations, and by scanning a QR code, more information can be found on the history of the location.

The information has been gathered by local historian Dr Ursula Callaghan, with photographs provided by Limerick’s Life website owner Sharon Slater.

As for the limericks, they were gathered through a means of a national and international competition to find the best local writers.

Dolores O’Riordan and Terry Wogan also penned their very own limericks.

One of the judges of the limericks competition, Dr Matthew Potter, who authored The Curious Story of the Limerick, does not feel the city’s connection to the five-liner is capitalised on properly.

“The limerick is one of the great underutilised resources of Limerick. I think the city is the only place in the world that has a poem named after it,” he said.

With more than one billion people understanding English, Dr Potter added: “If even a tiny fraction of these were made aware of the connection, it would do so much to promote the city and county both nationally and internationally.”