Limerick economic plan ‘could deliver 5,000 jobs’

Nick Rabbitts

Reporter:

Nick Rabbitts

Limerick economic plan ‘could deliver 5,000 jobs’
THE biggest urban renewal programme for the city centre in decades could deliver more than 5,000 jobs to the area.

THE biggest urban renewal programme for the city centre in decades could deliver more than 5,000 jobs to the area.

The long-awaited economic strategy for Limerick City and County provides for a major transformation of the streetscape in the city centre, with the demolition of Sarsfield House, and the creation of a new city centre square included.

Codenamed Project Limerick, the plan gives a roadmap for a complete regeneration of the city centre by 2030.

Some €250m will be required for the plan - but Finance Minister Michael Noonan has insisted the plans “will not even reach the shelf”.

“Higher value” jobs are being targeted at the Medical Park in the King’s Island, a new visitor and entertainment zone on the quayside providing office and service-based employment.

As well as this, jobs are

being sought at a major new visitor attraction in Sarsfield Street, and a €30m Urban Science and Technology Park at the former Cleeves site.

The city’s three third level institutions are to come together to create a €40m city centre campus near the Opera Centre site, with a recommendation of at least 500 students from UL’s School of Architecture Moving to town.

In a bid to copper-fasten Limerick’s place as “the premier shopping destination” on the West Coast, there will be a major redevelopment of Arthur’s Quay Shopping Centre, and Cruises Street. An expanded shopping precinct would be centred around Patrick Street, O’Connell Street, William Street and Cruises Street, while Georgian Limerick could also be redeveloped.

The Opera Centre site will see an innovation hub for new businesses, and a new city square will be built at Honan’s Quay/Cruises Street.

See today’s Monday tabloid edition for more analysis of the plan for Limerick, and also in our weekend editions.

Let us know what you think about the Limerick 2030 plans by commenting below, by email or on Twitter. Comments may be used in the print edition later this week.