Limerick ‘bird of the day’ page has wings clipped

Anne Sheridan

Reporter:

Anne Sheridan

The popular LIT 'bird of the day' page, which is still online
A CONTROVERSIAL Facebook page highlighting ‘birds of the day’ at the University of Limerick has been removed from the online social networking site, after another page in University College Cork provoked outrage.

A CONTROVERSIAL Facebook page highlighting ‘birds of the day’ at the University of Limerick has been removed from the online social networking site, after another page in University College Cork provoked outrage.

It is not known whether the university, the students’ union, the administrator of the site, or Facebook themselves decided to remove the page which featured daily updates of what were deemed to be the prettiest or sexiest women on campus - some of which were submitted by the women themselves, and which attracted over 10,000 ‘likes’.

While the photos were not sexually explicit, it’s understood the university had been working with the students’ union to have it removed.

The UCC site was also removed last week, while a similar page from University College Dublin has been replaced with pictures of actual birds of the feathered variety.

Emma Porter, president of the students’ union at UL, said: “While ULSU recognises that university life is not solely about academia and that pages, such as these, are set-up with the intention of being a light hearted bit of fun; we also acknowledge there comes a point wherein students must be aware of the potential negative consequences pages like this may have.

“As such UL students’ union and the university are strongly advising students that UL is monitoring social media sites linked to the university for breaches in its code of conduct for UL students.”

Chris Walshe, president of the students’ union of Limerick Institute of Technology, said they do “not condone any social media pages which target LIT students in a negative way.

“We feel that these pages are counter-active to the work we do to promote mental health awareness and the prevention of bullying,” he told the Limerick Leader.

The LIT Bird of the Day page was still online at the time of writing, and had over 1,400 ‘likes.’

Facebook said the UCC site contained nudity or pornography, references to drug use, and could be viewed as harassment, and as a result, violated its “community standards”, and took the decision to remove it.