Irish Water declines to reveal Limerick numbers

Nick Rabbitts

Reporter:

Nick Rabbitts

Cllr Cian Prendiville burning an Irish water application pack during a protest march last October [Picture: Dave Gaynor]
IRISH Water has declined to reveal how many people in Limerick they have taken charges from since the first bills were issued.

IRISH Water has declined to reveal how many people in Limerick they have taken charges from since the first bills were issued.

Northside Anti-Austerity Alliance (AAA) councillor Cian Prendiville wrote to the state ater utility to ask how many bills had been issued in Limerick, how many of these are now past their due date and how many had been paid in full.

In response, a member of Irish Water’s local representative support desk said: “We are not in a position to confirm payment information at this time.”

She said this was because of the various different methods in which water charge bills are being issued, as well as variations due to some customers being metered and unmetered.

This Saturday, the AAA will hold a “bonfire” for anyone who wants to burn their bills.

The protest - which Cllr Prendiville believes will be one of the biggest bonfires the city has ever seen - will take place between 2pm and 3pm outside City Hall.

He says the bonfire represents a chance for those opposed to water charges to come together.

“Non-payment is not an individual action, it is part of a mass movement - the biggest movement in the history of the state. This event is about solidarity, people standing together and burning their bills, sending a clear message to Irish Water and the government that we have no intentions of paying twice for water. We already pay for water through our taxes. We won’t pay for Denis O’Brien’s greed,” he said in a statement.

Cllr Prendiville says the protest will be colourful, lively, with face-painting, music balloons, and an ice-cream van.

“There will also be a ‘Trial of Denis O’Brien’, where we will have a mock billionaire take the stand,” he added.

Water bills have been widely circulated across Limerick, with the unmetered charge ranging from between €40 to €65.

The billing process started in early April, and was introduced on a phased basis across the country.