UL must show ‘stronger commitment’ to city

Alan Owens

Reporter:

Alan Owens

'We wont be found wanting': Tom Enright (right) in conversation with the manager of the merged local authorities in Limerick, Conn Murray
LIMERICK’s head of economic development has said that the “powers that be” in UL need to show a “stronger commitment” to the city centre and that the merged local authority “won’t be found wanting in providing support” in return.

LIMERICK’s head of economic development has said that the “powers that be” in UL need to show a “stronger commitment” to the city centre and that the merged local authority “won’t be found wanting in providing support” in return.

Tom Enright, economic development director with Limerick City and County Council, made the remarks at the launch of the results of a think tank commissioned by the University to come up with ways to “change the city”.

The innovative, multi-disciplinary Intelligence Unit - a collaboration between the architecture and business schools - unveiled the fruits of the intensive research project last week in the city gallery, throwing up costed plans to revitalise the city.

Acknowledging that it was a “fantastic project”, Mr Enright said: “What we do need is a greater commitment from the powers that be within the University to give a stronger commitment to the city centre, because any modern international city has a strong third level presence.”

“The University with a strong presence here in the city centre would do wonders for revitalising and bringing more activity into the city centre.

“We would do whatever we can to make space available and whatever else we can do to try and encourage that to happen and we won’t be found wanting in providing support to the University to commit to the city centre.”

The 2030 plan for Limerick framed the think tank’s analysis. Professor Merritt Bucholz of the School of Architecture said the project’s analysis has thrown up “very realisable, very practical ideas, which we want to become jobs for our graduates”.