Fate of Parkway Valley site in Limerick at hands of planners

Anne Sheridan

Reporter:

Anne Sheridan

MOVEMENT is expected on the stalled Parkway Valley site on the outskirts of the city, after an application to extend the length of construction time on site was lodged last week to Limerick County Council.

MOVEMENT is expected on the stalled Parkway Valley site on the outskirts of the city, after an application to extend the length of construction time on site was lodged last week to Limerick County Council.

A decision from the council’s planning office is due in October, and senior planners - rather than councillors or objectors - will have to adjudicate on whether to give the developers more time to complete the site.

Among their considerations is whether the development can be completed within a specified timeframe.

“We have to decide whether to extend it or not. ‘Alocin’ got an original planning permission, but they modified it five times, so what they’re doing is extending each of those applications,” Gerry Sheeran, senior planner with Limerick County Council, told the Limerick Leader.

Belfast based developer Suneil Sharma, who sold on his interests in Limerick’s stalled €300m Opera Centre site, was appointed as a director to Alocin this month, this newspaper can reveal.

While Alocin is one of developer Liam Carroll’s companies, the application to county hall was made by Dublin based planning firm, DPP, which is primarily concentrated in the UK.

When contacted by the Limerick Leader, a spokesperson said they were not authorised to comment on the future of the site.

Construction started four years ago on the €150m Parkway Valley site on the Dublin Road– a 92 unit development, which was to include an Olympic sized ice-rink, a 10-screen cinema and up to 40 retail units.

They later applied to omit the cineplex amongst other aspects of the 58,000 square metre site.

Mr Carroll halted development on the site in 2008 after failing to secure anchor tenants.

Tesco Extra and Penney’s were advertised to occupy these slots in the 250,261 square foot development.

Receivers have been appointed to other firms in his property portfolio, but Alocin is currently operating as normal.

The skeletal development has been left vacant since, and even most of the cranes have been sold to investors abroad at auction.