Valentine’s rock: The Cranberries for Jay Leno show appearance

Alan Owens

Reporter:

Alan Owens

THE CRANBERRIES will celebrate the release of their first studio album in over a decade with appearances on three of America’s most high profile television shows early next month.

THE CRANBERRIES will celebrate the release of their first studio album in over a decade with appearances on three of America’s most high profile television shows early next month.

The Limerick quartet, who reformed in late 2009 after a seven year absence, will appear on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon, The View and The Tonight Show With Jay Leno - the latter on Valentine’s Day - to promote their new album Roses, which is to be released worldwide on February 24.

The video for anthemic lead single Tomorrow, which was recorded last month in Dublin, was released online this Wednesday and instantly recalls the band’s classic tracks.

Singer Dolores O’Riordan, whose father passed away recently, explained that Tomorrow “was written really spontaneously”.

“People tend to overly ponder, it is the human condition, and Tomorrow is about getting away from the consuming thought process,” she explained.

Despite breaking up in 2003 after selling in the region of 40 million records worldwide, the band revealed this week that they never really broke off contact with each other, with O’Riordan and guitarist Noel Hogan in particular staying in firm contract.

“We did the reunion tour, we started at the end of 2009, but Dolores and I had actually been writing for a few years before that, not knowing whether it would be a Cranberries album, or what it would be,” explained Hogan. “It was just the chemistry we have always had, so we kept writing on the down time and as the tour developed, so did the writing, and it just seemed like (recording an album was) the next natural thing to do.”

The band’s reunion tour saw them play 107 concerts across Europe, North and South America and Asia, culminating in their first ever shows in China in 2011. They performed a thumping set at the opening ceremony of the Special Olympics in Thomond Park in 2010, their first appearance in the stadium.

Hogan recently told the Leader that Roses was a more “mature version of the earlier albums”.

“You’d know it was us a mile away, but it’s not a heavy album by any means, it’s a bit more laid-back,” he said.

Roses will be the band’s sixth studio album and was recorded in Toronto with producer Stephen Street, who produced several of their previous records. “The minute we started playing, it felt like we’d never stopped,” Dolores said. “There’s something about playing with The Cranberries. It’s like putting on a perfect pair of shoes. It just fits.”

O’Riordan had confirmed to the Leader in mid-2009 that the band were due to re-unite, saying: “For so long there was so much pressure. When you are 20 years old and that many people are looking at you, of course you are going to screw up. Every mistake that you make is publicised.

The pair appeared on the BBC’s breakfast show this week and both admitted to having panic attacks at the height of their fame.

“It began great, especially with the first two albums, but we look back at it now, and we think that we should probably have taken a break after that - we went straight in and did the third album and it started to get a little bit out of our control then,” explained Noel.

Dolores added: “You get burnt out like anything if you keep going - you have to stop and go home and we should really have stopped in hindsight after the second album and we didn’t and we all went a bit mental and cracked up. We were just working too much”.