Aid worker arrives in Limerick after charity walk

Fintan Walsh

Reporter:

Fintan Walsh

Sore feet: Adrian Horsman pictured at St Mary's Cathedral after finishing his walk from St Anne's Cathedral, Belfast
A FORMER BBC and TV3 broadcaster, who did a 200 mile charity walk from Belfast, finally arrived in Limerick on Sunday evening.

A FORMER BBC and TV3 broadcaster, who did a 200 mile charity walk from Belfast, finally arrived in Limerick on Sunday evening.

Adrian Horsman, head of media at Christian Aid, raised nearly €1,000 to raise awareness about people in third world countries who have to walk miles to get water.

Originally from Tipperary, he arrived at his final destination at St Mary’s Cathedral, greeted by work colleagues and Dean of Limerick Very Rev Sarah Pragnell.

“I finally arrived into Limerick on Sunday, from Nenagh to Limerick. I came via O’Brien’s Bridge and through the Ardnacrusha canal walk. It was a pretty way to walk, but I was struggling too much to admire it.

“I was greeted by the Very Reverend Sandra Pragnell and she walked with me for the last mile, all the way back to the cathedral. Alix Tiernan - she’s a Christian Aid member of staff who works in Limerick - she also greeted me and walked with me for the last mile,” he said.

With just a rucksack and a bivi-bag, the charity walker said the nine-day challenge was harder than he had imagined.

“To be honest, when I was planning this, I thought it was going to be a walking holiday to get through the Irish countryside, but it was really hard. Walking the distance is much harder than it sounds. Day after day, pounding the roads for 10 hours; it got tough,” he explained.

He revealed that he lost three stone in weight and six inches off his waistline since he started training for the 200 mile trek, before Christmas.

“From my point of view, it’s good to have something to get fit for. The physical challenge is a good thing.”

He said the biggest challenge was the frightening traffic along the N52 the day he got lost in Cavan. He said car drivers were reckless in comparison to lorry drivers.

“I could have got a bus to Limerick, or I could have asked a friend to give me a lift and gave up along the way, but a child bringing water doesn’t have a choice,” the former journalist said.