Limerick city club to re-open as ‘The Orchard’ bar and live venue

Alan Owens

Reporter:

Alan Owens

THE city centre property that once housed the Trinity Rooms nightclub is to be re-opened early this month under new management as a live music venue and bar.

THE city centre property that once housed the Trinity Rooms nightclub is to be re-opened early this month under new management as a live music venue and bar.

The venue is be called the Orchard Bar and will be open six nights a week from the early part of the month, with an official launch on September 22.

Up to 15 jobs will be created by the venue’s opening, while the same number have been involved in an extensive re-fit and construction costing close to €70,000.

Well known local publicans Anthony O’Dwyer and Clem Smith, plus city businessman and promoter Philip Geraghty, are the partners behind the new venue’s operation, which they believe will “be dramatically different to what it was”.

“It is very tastefully done,” explained Corbally man Philip. “We drafted in the best designers in the country - they have done the Wright Venue and Crystal. It harks back to an old, boutique look, people won’t recognise it, it is totally different.

The trio plan to initially open the courtyard and bar area of the venue, located on the ground floor of the Granary building on Michael Street, with a view to potentially re-opening the nightclub in mid-2013.

“The outdoor area is going to be the venue. We are building a new stage outside,” he added.

Patrick Purcell, formerly of the Icon and Angel Lane, has been appointed as general manager and the venue has received in excess of 200 CVs in a 24-hour period since advertising for staff.

“Our goal is that all of our staff and security will be friendly and courteous, they will welcome you into the venue. The vibe and atmosphere is going to be totally different,” explained Philip.

The trio feel that there is a market for the venue and plan to open six nights a week, with late openings on at least three of those. They are aiming at age 23 and up, with just one student night a week.

“We feel that opening a bar in a recession is a very good time to do that,” he explained. “We got a very good deal on the arrangement down there, we want to give it a go, Limerick needs something different. It needs options. We are not trying to take business from anyone else, we want to build our own market and develop it.”

The venue closed last year with the loss of 50 jobs amid controversy over health and safety concerns. The Circuit Court recently approved applications to revive liquor licences for the bar and adjoining nightclub.