Rhyme crime: Limerick to get its missing limerick back

Mike Dwane

Reporter:

Mike Dwane

Bundlbee's Serena Hartigan, Tara Hartigan and Mark Manning at the Treaty Stone, one of the locations on their Limerick's Limericks virtual walking tour of the city
LIMERICK is to get its missing limerick back after thieves struck across the road from the Hunt Museum and made off with one of 12 plaques erected around the city as part of an innovative virtual walking tour.

LIMERICK is to get its missing limerick back after thieves struck across the road from the Hunt Museum and made off with one of 12 plaques erected around the city as part of an innovative virtual walking tour.

The signs each include a limerick on a local attraction and a QR code that can be scanned with a smartphone to bring up more information on that place of interest. They were erected last year as part of the Limerick’s Limericks project - an initiative of local company Bundlbee and supported by Limerick City of Culture.

Last week, an eagle-eyed Twitter user (@TheTweetyStone) noted that the plaque relating to the Hunt Museum had been removed from its mounting on a pole on Rutland Street.

But Bundlbee’s Tara Hartigan said the missing sign would be replaced.

“We don’t know what happened to it. We reckon that that particular one may just have been placed too low. It was a City of Culture project and we were dealing with the council so we had to make sure they were all in place to meet a deadline,” Ms Hartigan said.

“We are going to go and replace the one that has been taken down but a bit more securely. We are putting the wheels in motion to replace it,” she added.

As part of the project, Bundlbee ran a competition for people to submit the famous five-line verses on particular attractions around the city.

And it was Limerick man Ciaran Crowe’s effort that was selected for the plaque singing the praises of the Hunt Museum and its founders.

Other locations included on the walking tour are Barringtons’ Hospital, King John’s Castle, Limerick City Gallery of Art, the Daniel O’Connell monument, the People’s Park, Tait’s Clock, St Mary’s Cathedral, the Treaty Stone, St John’s Square, the Patrick Sarsfield monument and the Frank McCourt Museum.