Sculpture honours emergency services in Limerick

Alan Owens

Reporter:

Alan Owens

A BELL encapsulated in ‘infinity symbols’ made out of bent steel rods now sits in Curragour Park on Clancy Strand in honour of past and present members of the emergency services in Limerick.

A BELL encapsulated in ‘infinity symbols’ made out of bent steel rods now sits in Curragour Park on Clancy Strand in honour of past and present members of the emergency services in Limerick.

The sculpture, designed by 20-year-old Limerick School of Art and Design student Michelle Perera at the behest of the emergency services, was officially unveiled this Tuesday by Mayor of Limerick Cllr Jim Long.

Garda Tony Miniter, chairman of the group founded to fundraise and build the sculpture, said it was “a fantastic and very suitable way to honour the bond between the people of Limerick and the emergency services, both past and present”.

“I had an idea that a memorial should be built to honour the service given to the people of Limerick by the past and present members of the emergency services. This sculpture would include all services, full and part time, from across Limerick city and county.

“We appreciate the bond we all have together working in this city and county. This memorial is a fitting tribute to those who go about their daily lives helping those who need it most,” he added.

Family members of those who have died in the line of service and current members of the emergency services and local councillors gathered to witness the sculpture’s unveiling on the banks of the River Shannon.

These included Anne McCabe, widow of Garda Jerry McCabe, Bernadette Liston and her daughters Noelle and Lynn, whose firefighter husband Michael Liston died in Barrigone, Askeaton in 2007 and Marie Kelliher, widow of Garda Brian Kelliher, who died in the same tragic road crash.

Mrs McCabe said the memorial was “wonderful” and that she was “very proud and privileged” to be present at the sculpture’s unveiling.

Michelle Perera, from Sri Lanka but living in Limerick for eight years, who created the spherical sculpture now located in the park, said: “The infinity symbols come together to form a continuous sphere for continuity, interdependence and harmony. The bell inside is for calling for aid or needing help, representing the emergency services”.

“I am delighted to see it now. It is everything I imagined, it has come together well,” she added.